Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both standard-and not so standard-concepts and ideas about illustrating data. He shows the myriad ways that reams of data can be presented so that they convey a point or conclusion that normal people can visualize - and feel the impact. Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users. It's an introductory book, I felt I knew most of what I was reading already (and I'm no expert). Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both standard-and not so standard-concepts and ideas about illustrating data. Steve Wexler, Nice exploration of and discussion around the process of creating data visualizations. A simple and practical introduction to do-it-yourself visualization. Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both standard-and not so standard-concepts and ideas about illustrating data. In Data Points: Visualization That Means Something, author Nathan Yau presents an intriguing complement to his bestseller Visualize This, this time focusing on the graphics side of data analysis. [Nathan Yau] -- The author uses examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, to explore concepts and ideas about illustrating data. S Titles Subscribed To OA Open Access Content T Free Trial Content F Free Content INFORMATION. Shares … For my book review I chose Nathan Yau’s 2013 ‘ Data Points: Visualization that means something ’. I personally thought the balance was a little off--there's almost nothing about how to actually create some of these quite complex graphics (I think there's another book by the same author that goes deeper into this). Put data to use among the unintiated. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Data Points: Visualization that Means Something at Amazon.com. In Data Points: Visualization That Means Something, author Nathan Yau presents an intriguing complement to his bestseller Visualize This, this time focusing on the graphics side of data analysis. Data points : visualization that means something. The cover design drew me in immediately and flicking through the pages I came across several really interesting visualisations that I wanted to know more about. Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both standard-and not so standard-concepts and ideas about illustrating data. This book is a good summary and overview of the current state of data visualization. Decent book about visualization, but nothing groundbreaking. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Lots of really nice looking data visualisations, explained core concept of human-understandable visualisations and other topics. Free shipping for many products! O’Reilly members get unlimited access to live online training experiences, plus books, videos, and digital content from 200+ publishers. In Data Points: Visualization That Means Something, author Nathan Yau presents an intriguing complement to his bestseller Visualize This, this time focusing on the graphics side of data analysis. Data Points reads like a friendly textbook engaged with visualization. Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both standard–and not so standard–concepts and ideas about illustrating data. Using examples from art, design,business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he exploresboth standard-and not so standard-concepts and ideas aboutillustrating data. Most of the message is explore and get to know your data through a wide variety of charts. So, nothing earth shaking but helpful around the margins. Data points : visualization that means something. Provided some useful skills to apply and ways to think about visualization. Good balance of explanations and examples. Who is the data about? This … - Selection from Data Points: Visualization That Means Something [Book] Seems a little bit dated, but that’s the nature of this field. There's so much overlap in all these recent data visualization books (Alberto Cairo, Stephen Few, Stephen Kosslyn, etc.) I learned a fair amount. Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both standard-and not so standard-concepts and ideas about illustrating data. There is much more detail in books like "Grammar of Graphics", "Semiology of Graphics", or any of Tufte's work, but this one pulls the basics together in one place, with good looking examples. Whether it's statistical charts, geographic maps, or the snappy graphical statistics you see on your favorite news sites, the art of data graphics or visualization is fast becoming a movement of its own. The writing has a great voice, which made it entertaining to read. O’Reilly members experience live online training, plus books, videos, and digital content from 200+ publishers. Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both standard-and not so standard-concepts and ideas about illustrating data. It lacked some organization issues and felt like I occasionally was reading the same thing. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Good solid introduction to the art of data visualization. by Wiley. Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both standard-and not so standard-concepts and ideas about illustrating data. More Less; Access Key. Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both standard-and not so standard-concepts and ideas about illustrating data. In this book Yau aimed to concentrate on the process of visualisation more than the technique. Nice book on visual thinking. There are also a few confusing typos that change the meaning of his (otherwise good) examples. By Nathan Yau. Lots of nice examples and exploration of the various questions a data designer should ask themselves. The review that I had read of this book suggested that it would explain the big deal about "big data." Again, cool results can be had with the programming examples in the book, sometimes surprising in their coolness. April 15th 2013 I would also highly recommend Bertin's Semiology of Graphics, which does much the same thing but with a much more comprehensive theory underlying the choices. For my book review I chose Nathan Yau’s 2013 ‘ Data Points: Visualization that means something ’. He begins to provide some basic instruction in statistics but only the most basic. Some of the guidance on creating visualizations was useful, some not (especially where the visualizations were for large data sets and the small print was hard to read). Shares intriguing ideas from … In Data Points: Visualization That Means Something, author Nathan Yau presents an intriguing complement to his bestseller Visualize This, this time focusing on the graphics side of data analysis. However, it is not as good as many others books on the topic: Tufte is my pick for the best (The Visual Display of Quantitative Information), and his book is much better produced than Data Points. Data Points often has illegible plots, blurry printing on some figures, an inconvenient choice of book binding for dual-page printing, and a rushed feeling when it comes to organization, layout, and narrative. Foster Provost, The cover design drew me in immediately and flicking through the pages I came across several really interesting visualisations that I wanted to know more about.
2020 data points: visualization that means something